Reverse-Gentrification of the Literary World

Akashic Books

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Category: Terrible Twosdays

Are you a parent going through the Terrible Twos? Did you live through them and survive? Terrible Twosdays is a place to commiserate over the unending shenanigans of your Darling Children (as the online parenting communities say). Nonfiction stories will be considered, so long as names have been changed to protect the guilty. Inspired by our best-selling gift book for parents, Go the Fuck to Sleep, Terrible Twosdays joins the roster of our other online short fiction series. Unlike Mondays Are Murder and Thursdaze, we’re looking for stories with a light and mischievous feel, all about the day-to-day challenges of parenting. As with our other flash fiction series, stories must not exceed 750 words.

“Tantrum” by Krystal A. Sital

She flies to her room with that awkward run that’s typical of children under three. It’s the the quick thump-thump-thump of her feet on the hardwood floors that makes me smile. Colette was a late walker, so that kind of purposeful movement, even if done in anger, amazes me . . .

“Captain America” by Angele Sionna

Captain America is cupping my son’s balls this morning.

Yes, you heard me right. Captain America—in full uniform, arms out wide, shield in hand—is spread across my four-year-old’s nuts as we speak . . . because when my son woke up this morning, he walked into the living room, frank and beans in full display on top of his pajama pants. When I inquired about this oddity, he said his pee-pee hurt and begged me to fix it. Of course I agreed to help. What’s a mommy to do? . . .

“The Five-Foot-Long Poop” by Jeff Sanger

My second child, my son, was born in 2007. My wife and his older sister and I welcomed him home with all the excitement and joy you can imagine, but his arrival was accompanied by something else. Something dark. And brown . . .

“Safe to Cry” by Nyaboke Nduati

In my mind I could hear the phone ringing, but my eyes were fixated on the first page of a chapter in my thesis that needed work. All I could think about was how sick I was of that thesis. It all seemed pointless. None of the contents of this two hundred–page document was going to change the world in the slightest way . . .

“Boarding School Drop-Off” by Leslie Martini

On September 11th of this year, we drove our thirteen-year-old daughter to a boarding school for children with learning differences.

It was the second-worst day in memory. The first was when she was three months old and the pediatrician told me she had fragile X syndrome . . .

“Pierced” by Mina MacLeod

It cut through me like a knife. Not a sharp one—quick and hot and over immediately, no. That would have been too simple. Jacob’s first meltdown was more like a dull, rusted blade that sawed its way back and forth over my heart . . .


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